's Jacob of Edessa and the Syriac Culture of His Day PDF

ISBN-10: 9004173471

ISBN-13: 9789004173477

Jacob of Edessa (c.640-708) is taken into account the main discovered Christian of the early days of Islam. In all fifteen contributions to this quantity, written by means of trendy experts, the interplay among Christianity, Judaism, and the recent faith is a crucial factor. The articles speak about Jacob's biography in addition to his place in early Islamic Edessa, and provides an entire photo of a few of the points of Jacob of Edessa's lifestyles and paintings as a pupil and clergyman. recognition is paid to his efforts within the fields of historiography, correspondence, canon legislations, textual content and interpretation of the Bible, language and translation, theology, philosophy, and technological know-how. The e-book, which marks the 1300th anniversary of Jacob's loss of life, additionally encompasses a bibliographical clavis.

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Additional info for Jacob of Edessa and the Syriac Culture of His Day (Monographs of the Peshitta Institute Leiden: Studies in the Syriac Versions of the Bible and their Cultural Contexts, Volume 18)

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And in fact common lemmata for Jacob Philoponus’ work and Michael’s Chronicle can be found,33 and since Michael called the author from whom he copied the lemmata ‘Jacob the Edessene’, the identification of Q¥swƒ xc R_Ž„j with Qj\^P R_Ž„j (var. ¦\^PZ R_Ž„j) may be accepted. We can also add another argument in confirmation of this. Michael the Elder, writing of the death of Dionysius bar Salibi (d. 34 Leaving for a moment the question of Jacob’s translation or reworking of the Chronicle of Eusebius, we may briefly comment that F.

Ta. 97). 670 edited by I. Guidi in Chronica minora 1 (CSCO 1, Syr. 1; Paris 1903), 38, mentions that the Arabs worship at the ‘dome of Abraham’; John bar Penkaye, R¯ eˇs mell¯ e, ed. Mingana, 155, trans. 183 (trans. Brock, ‘Book XV’, 64), knows that there is ‘a certain locality in the south where their sanctuary was’, the Muslims’ ‘House of God’. 46 Crone and Cook, Hagarism, 23–24, argue for a north-west Arabian location, but see Hoyland, Seeing Islam, 562–575. 47 G. 2; Paris 1920), 193–194, 245–250, 252; Quaestiones ad Antiochum ducem, PG 28, 617D–624B, Q.

Today we also know of another, more complete, manuscript of the same Arabic chronicle (Ms. Leeds University, Syr. 7, fols. 8r–12v) and since its historiographical narrative, fragmentary as it is, reaches the year ad 1031, it is clear that the attribution is false. Y. L. Young, who published the Garshuni fragments,79 established that they contain excerpts from the Arabic translation of Michael the Elder’s Chronicle. Michael, however, did include in his Chronicle some pre-Constantinian material which he attributed to Jacob.

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Jacob of Edessa and the Syriac Culture of His Day (Monographs of the Peshitta Institute Leiden: Studies in the Syriac Versions of the Bible and their Cultural Contexts, Volume 18)


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